Alistair Burnett

Alistair Burnett is Director of News for Sightsavers, the NGO that works around the world to eliminate avoidable blindness and promote equality for people with visual impairments and other disabilities. Before that he spent 26 years with BBC News where he was the Editor of 'The World Tonight' on Radio 4 for ten years and before that Editor of 'Newshour' on BBC World Service. Alistair has a particular interest in international relations and the shifting power relations in the world challenging the traditional US and European dominance of global affairs.

Brazil fluffing its lines?

The World Cup in Brazil is less than a month away and the bad publicity is mounting with the news that the coach of the national team is being charged with...

The right recipe for democracy

“There’s more to democracy than free and fair elections”. This is a refrain we’ve heard more than once since the anti-government protests broke out in major...

Libya strains NATO

I've done a piece for YaleGlobal about the implications for NATO of its operation in Libya With Operation Unified Protector in Libya, NATO enters war for the...

Foreign Policy ironies

Prime Minister, David Cameron’s tour of the Gulf on a trade promotion mission as the Arab world is rocked by mass protests against long-lasting authoritarian...

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As COVID-19 plunges the world into its most serious economic crisis for a century, a surge in demand for justice is inevitable. Businesses face bankruptcy – and whole industries may be insolvent. Similar pain is being felt in the public and non-profit sectors....

Who Speaks for the Global South Recipients of Aid?

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