notes from
the 
long crisis

Justice for All and the Economic Crisis

Justice for All and the Economic Crisis

As COVID-19 plunges the world into its most serious economic crisis for a century, a surge in demand for justice is inevitable. The impact on justice systems will be enormous. Already battered by the pandemic and by the strains of designing and regulating lockdowns, they should expect millions more people to need help with evictions and job losses, with debt and bankruptcy, and with disputes within families, with neighbours, and with businesses and those who are supposed to provide them with public services. Today, I join an amazing group of 42 thought leaders from the justice sector in publishing Justice for All and the Economic Crisis.

About us

Global Dashboard is a platform for ideas to tackle the long crisis of globalization and fresh thinking on the pandemic. Our authors work on global issues in think tanks, government, civil society, academia and the media. More…

Editors

Alex Evans  

Founder of the Collective Psychology Project

David Steven 

Senior Fellow, NYU Center on International Cooperation

Who Speaks for the Global South Recipients of Aid?

Who Speaks for the Global South Recipients of Aid?

The murder of George Floyd and the resurfacing of the Black Lives Matter movement has led to heightened discussions on race in the international development sector. Aid practitioners in the North have not only condemned the systemic racism that they (suddenly) now see to be endemic in the sector, but have also vowed to ‘change’ or even ‘end’ aid altogether. COVID-19 has further spurred analysis of how the sector may now change – or not – post pandemic. But decisions about how aid should be ‘done’ in developing countries should be taken by those at the receiving end.

Collections

Freedom and Justice Week Magazine

This article is part of our Freedom and Justice Week series – as Global Dashboard provides a platform for a diversity of voices to explore how we respond to the wave of protests that followed the murder of George Floyd. Read all the articles in the series here....

Scenarios Week Round-Up

Last month, we launch the #LongCrisisScenarios in partnership with the Local Trust. The four scenarios describe COVID-19 futures where the response is polarised or where collective action predominates, and where decision-making is centralised or distributed. For the...

Publications

Justice for All and the Economic Crisis

As COVID-19 plunges the world into its most serious economic crisis for a century, a surge in demand for justice is inevitable. Businesses face bankruptcy – and whole industries may be insolvent. Similar pain is being felt in the public and non-profit sectors....

Our COVID Future: The Long Crisis Scenarios

Created in partnership with: COVID-19 marks a turning point in the 21st century.​ Levels of uncertainty are off the chart, making predictions impossible. ​But if we can create plausible stories about different futures, we create a...

A Blueprint for Black Lives Matter in the Development Sector

A Blueprint for Black Lives Matter in the Development Sector

Racism is rooted in a combination of prejudice and power, and action to combat racism must address both. The development sector is plagued by problems on both dimensions, but the Black Lives Matter moment offers an opportunity to change course. So far, however, development organisations have focused more on prejudice rather than confronting inequalities of power. To do more, we should adapt models from elsewhere to our own challenge. So here’s my four-point blueprint for Black Lives Matter in the development sector.

COVID-19 – Five lessons for improving future economic and social resilience

COVID-19 – Five lessons for improving future economic and social resilience

The COVID-19 crisis is another timely reminder of the need for building resilience into our social, economic, and financial systems – locally, nationally, and globally. It has exposed the vulnerability of our societies, of our health systems, but also the susceptibility of supply chains and the gig economy. Financial systems have held up relatively well, thanks to stricter capital requirements introduced after the 2008 crisis and decisive intervention by central banks, but are now also starting to show cracks. Increasing resilience needs to be one of the main guiding principles to ensure we are better prepared to withstand future pandemics.

Love, Inequity, and Development Policy in a COVID-era?

Love, Inequity, and Development Policy in a COVID-era?

This piece is a call for intimacy and to centre all of our work in a “politics of trust, empathy, love and care.” We know those emotions to be real, human, and to matter. Accepting that charges us with this: reconceiving how we address inequity and inequality (which remain the core mission of the problematic global institutions that we both still….love) through trust, and care, and love. How can we weave these ideas into everything that international institutions do? How do we get all the staff, workers, and seemingly inanimate ‘programmes’ to let our messy, warm humanity be the focus of our work, rather than the technocratically convenient, and theoretically bloodless numerical success of ‘ending poverty’?

Freedom and Justice Week Round Up

Freedom and Justice Week Round Up

Over the course of Freedom and Justice Week, our authors have provided glimpses into how racism has penetrated their communities, their workplaces, their schools, and their countries. What these articles demonstrate is that, while country contexts may vary, humanity has a problem with racism and bigotry that knows no borders and that is pervasive, toxic, and dehumanising. For people asking “what can I do?” our authors did not disappoint. Across the board, they call for action – from institutions and individuals, and all points in between. This series offers a place to start and a challenge to be honest, ambitious, and practical.

The Privilege in Protesting Police Brutality

The Privilege in Protesting Police Brutality

The United States is confronted by the culmination of its long history of police brutality and exploitation of Black people. And the stark reality of privilege in this country was also made clear as Black people faced higher infection and mortality rates of COVID-19. It is clear that no matter what crisis Americans face, Black people will suffer trauma at a disproportionate rate. It is now time for privileged individuals to acknowledge the liberties and capital they have is tainted by the trauma of individuals they have never met.

The Western Spring

The Western Spring

Over the last few weeks, The Western Spring unmasked how little Black lives matter. In the US, while Black people make up only 13% of the US population, they are three times more likely to be killed by police and make up over a quarter of deaths by COVID-19. As young leaders, we recognise that in order to succeed in our work while living in a country that continues to reinforce systematic racism and white supremacy, we must continue to challenge the institutions upholding racial and ethnic inequalities.

I’m black. I’m a peacebuilder. I want your help.

I’m black. I’m a peacebuilder. I want your help.

We’re living in a painful time in America’s story. It sucks. That being said, we also have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to finish the chapter. To write history. To shape the future in a momentous way. To build a world where my now three-year-old son can walk the streets safely and confidently with your son. We can get there.

Crafting a Lasting, Global Legacy for George Floyd

Crafting a Lasting, Global Legacy for George Floyd

This moment is a fitting one to consolidate a body of work by activists, academics, and other civil society organisations into an international instrument capturing our shared commitment to finally eradicating police brutality everywhere. But are resolutions and debates are an adequate and constructive response to the global outcry? The time and resources of the African Union would be better spent consolidating work into a binding standard against which all states should be monitored and evaluated.

Sea of Change: A New Wave of Activism in Bermuda

Sea of Change: A New Wave of Activism in Bermuda

While Bermuda does not have the same racialised violence that has sparked widespread protest in the United States, even our idyllic island is not immune to the poison prejudice of racism. We have our own brand of racism – it just looks and feels different. It always has. But now is the moment to right the wrongs and the tides are changing.

Realising the True Potential of International Schools

Realising the True Potential of International Schools

As women of colour, we have seen racism manifest itself in our personal and professional lives. As products of international schools, we have also benefited from the tremendous privilege of being educated in world-class institutions and being exposed to many cultures, religions, and ethnicities from an early age. While there are many examples of the good work and progress that have been made by international schools to address racism, there are many others that continue to shelter an environment of racial inequity. The protests around the world provide a moment of reckoning and a teachable moment and we ask that the systems that govern international schools do better.