Who cares? R2P is RIP

Courtesy of The Times

Our collective inability to do f*** all in Zimbabwe is, you have admit, awe-inspiring. On Tuesday the African Union rejected tougher action against Zimbabwe saying only dialogue could solve the nation’s crisis.That’s right people, rhetoric not rehydration therapy is key to sorting this crisis out.

The international community have met all (except one) criteria for a Just War:

1. A just war can only be waged as a last resort. All non-violent options must be exhausted before the use of force can be justified. Check

2. A war is just only if it is waged by a legitimate authority. Even just causes cannot be served by actions taken by individuals or groups who do not constitute an authority sanctioned by whatever the society and outsiders to the society deem legitimate. UN Mandate needed

3. A just war can only be fought to redress a wrong suffered. For example, self-defense against an armed attack is always considered to be a just cause. Check

4. A war can only be just if it is fought with a reasonable chance of success. Deaths and injury incurred in a hopeless cause are not morally justifiable. Check

5. The ultimate goal of a just war is to re-establish peace. More specifically, the peace established after the war must be preferable to the peace that would have prevailed if the war had not been fought. The violence used in the war must be proportional to the injury suffered. States are prohibited from using force not necessary to attain the limited objective of addressing the injury suffered. Check

6. The weapons used in war must discriminate between combatants and non-combatants. Civilians are never permissible targets of war, and every effort must be taken to avoid killing civilians. The deaths of civilians are justified only if they are unavoidable victims of a deliberate attack on a military target.Check

A short intervention followed by a multi-national stabilisation & humanitarian force is militarily and logistically feasible. What are we waiting for?

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About Charlie Edwards

Charlie Edwards is Director of National Security and Resilience Studies at the Royal United Services Institute. Prior to RUSI he was a Research Leader at the RAND Corporation focusing on Defence and Security where he conducted research and analysis on a broad range of subject areas including: the evaluation and implementation of counter-violent extremism programmes in Europe and Africa, UK cyber strategy, European emergency management, and the role of the internet in the process of radicalisation. He has undertaken fieldwork in Iraq, Somalia, and the wider Horn of Africa region.