Bush’s war crimes

Day by day, it seems more likely that senior members of the Bush administration will be prosecuted for war crimes.

There’s a new report out on medical evidence of US torture. Antonio Taguba, the Major-General who investigated Abu Ghraib and was then forced to retire, wrote the preface:

This report tells the largely untold human story of what happened to detainees in our custody when the Commander-in-Chief and those under him authorized a systematic regime of torture. This story is not only written in words: It is scrawled for the rest of these individuals’ lives on their bodies and minds. Our national honor is stained by the indignity and inhumane treatment these men received from their captors.

Taguba continues:

After years of disclosures by government investigations, media accounts, and reports from human rights organizations, there is no longer any doubt as to whether the current administration has committed war crimes. The only question that remains to be answered is whether those who ordered the use of torture will be held to account.

These are some of the practices documented in the report:

  • Suspensions and other stress positions;
  • Routine isolation;
  • Sleep deprivation combined with sensory bombardment and temperature extremes;
  • Sexual humiliation and forced nakedness;
  • Sodomy;
  • Beatings;
  • Denial of medical care;
  • Electric shock;
  • Involuntary medication; and
  • Threats to their lives and families.

Meanwhile, evidence is slowly mounting to show that torture was authorised at the highest levels of the Bush administration. Mark Benjamin has a useful time line. Under questioning, senior officials are sounding increasingly desperate:

William “Jim” Haynes II, the man who blessed the use of dogs, hoods and nudity to pry information out of recalcitrant detainees, proved to be a model of evasion himself as he resisted all attempts at inquiry by the Armed Services Committee.

Did he ask a subordinate to get information about harsh questioning techniques?

“My memory is not perfect.”

Did he see a memo about the effects of these techniques?

“I don’t specifically remember when I saw this.”

Did he remember doing something with the information he got?

“I don’t remember doing something with this information.”

When did he discuss these methods with other Bush administration officials?

“I don’t know precisely when, and I cannot discuss it further without getting into classified information.”

People are going to go to jail for this – and they’ll be much more senior than the small fry currently doing time. How high will the investigation go? Higher than most commentators probably think…